2019 SUMMER RAINFALL COM PARISON FOR NORFOLK, SUFFOLK & EAST ANGLIA

Written by Peter George. Posted in Weather Reports

 

Month

Diana Perowne

Pauline Roberts

Graham Allison

David King

Terry Read

Peter George

Met. Office Averages

 

Hevingham Norfolk

Wendling Norfolk

Thorpe St Andrew Norfolk

Brooke Norfolk

Sisland Norfolk

Pakenham Suffolk

East Anglia

May

35.0mm

34.5mm

39.0mm

43.3mm

34.8mm

36.5mm

43.0mm

June

86.0mm

115.5mm

106.0mm

114.5mm

107.8mm

94.0mm

89.5mm

July

14.0mm

26.5mm

37.0mm

50.0mm

48.2mm

36.5mm

39.5mm

August

24.5mm

39.5mm

38.0mm

25.7mm

26.8mm

29.5mm

36.3mm

May – August Total

159.5mm

216.0mm

220.0mm

233.5mm

217.6mm

196.5mm

208.3mm

Year to Date Total

285.5mm

358.5mm

384.0mm

391.8mm

344.2mm

292.0mm

324.5mm

Another topsy-turvy set of figures with May, July and August below average rainfall and June with above average. Despite that very useful rainfall in June the total for the year so far is well below what might be expected by the end of August. From my observations, gardens are beginning to suffer, with even some well established shrubs and trees looking decidedly unhappy with sparse, pale, drooping leaves.

The sunshine total hours of 843 during this period have been much the same as in the previous six years apart from the high of 1017 hours in 2018. However, periods of intense heat with record breaking temperatures have given our climate a Mediterranean feel. Perhaps we should be adapting our gardens to these hotter, drier conditions?

Peter George

05/09/2019

Garden Visit: Tudor Lodgings, Castle Acre, 10th August

Written by Jan Oakley. Posted in Events Past

Tudor Lodgings is set within the huge and ancient earthworks that form the dry moat and walls of Castle Acre. As you might imagine the views were spectacular and far reaching from what must have been the highest point for many miles. Our visit was on the windiest August day that I can remember, but as the garden is mainly set down below the earthworks, walking around was calm and peaceful. Amongst the characterful buildings set within these walls was an old dovecote holding hundreds possibly thousands of nest spaces.

We enjoyed the herbaceous borders and lovely wild flower meadow, where war is waged on a daily basis against rabbits and deer. A large area behind the wild flowers had been planted with Panicum grass to form another meadow, which was mesmerising in the wind.

In front of the house we were treated to a large and wonderful abstract box topiary and a symmetrical Mondrian knot garden planted with flowers in each of the primary colours.

Julia the owner has an extensive collection of watering cans. The sculptural examples ranged from just a few inches tall on the gate posts to an enormous 3-4 feet example standing proudly in front of the house.

We enjoyed tea, cakes and sandwiches on the terrace while watching the wind wreak havoc on the lawn, felling what remained of an old and sickly Judas tree. Another planting opportunity I imagine.

Words and Photos by Jan Oakley

 

 

 

 

PR Events

Written by Linda Hall. Posted in News

PR events
 
We have been very active this year attending plant fairs and promoting Norfolk & Suffolk Group HPS.
 
Saturday 27th April:  NNHS talk by Adrian Bloom on The Bressingham Gardens at the John Innes Conference Centre.  Jan Oakley and Susan Oglesby represented us where we had a publicity stand.  This was well received by visitors especially as we were giving away free seeds from the HPS Seed Distribution Scheme.  It was also the first time our new display board was used.
 
 
 
 
South Suffolk Show on 29th and 30th May – due to unforeseen circumstances we did not attend this event.
 
 
Saturday 8th June: East Ruston Old Vicarage Garden Plant Fair.  Chris Davies, Jan Oakley, Susan Oglesby, Barbra Back and myself attended.  Now I know we are hardy planters but this was pushing it to the limit!  The weather was atrocious – extremely wet and windy which necessitated four of us each hanging on to a leg of the gazebo to prevent it being blown away whilst one person served customers.  Despite being soaked and cold we still kept up the banter and smiling and managed to raise £234 for group funds.
 

 
 
Sunday 7th July: Hatten Farm Nurseries 40th Anniversary Celebration.  Liz Bloom, Graham Boutell and myself attended on this sunny day to sell plants.  Unfortunately this was not a financial success as there weren’t many ‘plants people’ and we only raised £34.
 

 
 
Sunday 14th July: NGS Open Day at Jan Oakley’s garden.  Chris Davies and myself attended on this beautiful warm day.  Many visitors were pleased to receive free seeds, donated by National as leftovers from the Seed Distribution.  A few people seemed very keen to join our group and took away application forms to complete so fingers crossed that we might gain some new members.  We also raised £159 from the plant sales.
 

 
 
Sunday 28th July: Aestival 2019 Summer Fair held at Raveningham Gardens.  Chris Davies, Jan Oakley, Susan Oglesby, Pamela Clark and myself attended at this well arranged event organised by CPRE Norfolk (Campaign to Protect Rural England).  We were placed at an excellent location and there were very few ‘plants’ stalls – we made a profit of £178.  Copies of our 2019 Programme and free seeds were handed out to members of the public. 
 

 
Linda
Chairman

HPS Summer Social, Jan & Mark Oakley's Garden, Beccles, 6th July

Written by Jacqui Hurst and Gill Clarke. Posted in Events Past

GROUP SUMMER SOCIAL 6th July

Despite rain earlier in the day, we were all able to enjoy Jan and Mark’s exquisite garden which complemented their Arts and Crafts house. We passed under a portico before walking into the garden at the rear of the house. After being welcomed with drinks and received name badges in the orangery, we were able to wander freely amidst the colour themed borders. Jan has the eye of an artist, with the use of an amazing palette. We were particularly taken with the hot border where rich colours blended together and the white border glowed after the rain. There were also surprises – euonymus topiary, subtle sculpture, a cutlery kingfisher and woodpecker. Specimen trees featured too, with a Cornus controversa Variegata’, a variegated Liriodendron, a Metasequoia and Paulownia to name a few. These gave height to the beds which were then layered with a variety of shrubs.

Salvias featured in many borders, from white, through pinks, reds to deep purple with penstemons and phlox. Dark coloured heuchera leaves and large leaved hostas gave texture and shape as well as other perennials, too many to mention. In a corner, a raised, gravelled area with blue Lutyens seat, palms and cordylines created a quiet viewing area over the garden. The pond area featured quirky stone swans and other sculptures. The balance between lawns and beds was perfect. A walkway of metal arches featured near the house where there were also many pots.

The catering was of the highest standard and cushions were brought out for the garden seats so we could sit, eat and have our glasses topped up, enjoying the company of fellow plantspeople. Our thanks go to Irene, Linda and Chris. Everyone seemed to enjoy the evening and it was a pleasure to be there.

Jacqui Hurst and Gill Clarke

Photos by Chris Davies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Garden Visit: Holm House, Drinkstone, Suffolk

Written by Graham Boutell. Posted in Events Past

8th June

Despite the inclement weather forecast, an intrepid group of four Group Members turned out for this visit to Holm House, which unfortunately clashed with a Plant Fair at East Ruston Old Vicarage. Nevertheless, we were in for a treat!

The family moved here four years ago, and the magnificent ‘old’ house was only built eleven years ago. We entered up a long, gravelled drive, and in the middle of the turning circle was a splendid formal pond with fountains, flanked by well-trimmed holm oaks (Quercus ilex).

The owner, Rebecca Shelley, gave us a guided tour of their 10-acre garden. The formal gardens surrounding the house were well planted incorporating several fine pieces of statuary, which were elegantly positioned.

A recent project has been the building of a 2-acre lake made of puddled clay with an island, already home to a family of Canada geese & mallard ducks. The lake is now stocked with trout. Surrounding the lake is a beautiful wildflower meadow, full of colour from poppies, oxeye-daisies and the rare bee orchid, (Ophrys apifera).

Rebecca has a splendid area near the house for growing cut flowers, complete with greenhouse. Husband Phil showed us his wonderful vegetable garden, most of which was under a net cage. The vegetables matched his military background, according to his wife, being positioned in very neat, well-spaced rows!

The family cat pretended to be uninterested but followed us round the entire garden! The peacock was always to be seen, usually looking down on us from up high, his mate being occupied sitting on her eggs. Wild birds seen recently included a marsh harrier, a Schedule 1 listed bird on the Wildlife and Countryside Act.

Unlike other parts of Suffolk that day, the weather managed to stay dry as we were entertained afterwards with lovely refreshments.