Indoor Meeting: Talk by Tony Goode "THE FOUR SEASONS"

Written by Peter Lyle. Posted in Events Past

THE FOUR SEASONS – Tony Goode  - 9th March

Spring Bulbs

Tony Goode

Our last talk of the winter season was given by Tony Goode, national collection holder for crocus spp. Tony explained that he did not have a professional background in horticulture but an early interest in growing alpines from bulb and seed led to increasing involvement with exhibiting at alpine shows and ultimately to curation of the crocus collection. His Norwich garden is relatively small with sandy soil so he grows many specimens and the crocus collection in pots, though choice bulbs and alpine plants also feature in the main garden throughout the year. As a keen photographer, he illustrated his talk with beautiful images of plants, planting associations and gardens, sometimes to the musical accompaniment of Vivaldi’s Four Seasons. As a local gardener he helpfully commented on those bulbs that will fare less well or better in Norfolk. For example, Narcissus cyclamineus does not enjoy Norfolk dry summers whereas N. bulbocodium is more tolerant of dry conditions. For the same reason he recommended Corydalis Craigton Blue, which goes dormant in very hot weather.  Lilium pyrenaicium will struggle in Norfolk gardens, unlike L. martagon which will do well. He confessed to rarely having the time to leave his home county and visit other gardens but featured 3 that he has found particularly inspirational: Compton Ash with its sand bed and extensive use of tufa, the garden at Ashwood nurseries and Branklyn.  But the most surprising ‘big garden’ photograph of all was of a spectacular meadow of crocus Tommasinianus  taken at our very own Earlham Cemetery. 

 

Indoor Meeting: Talk by Matthew Tanton Brown "COMPANION PLANTING"

Written by Peter George. Posted in Events Past

COMPANION PLANTING - Matthew Tanton Brown, 9th February 2019

 

Matthew Tanton Brown

Matthew is a consultant and the part time manager at ‘A Place for Plants’ in East Bergholt. Having learned his horticultural skills at RHS Wisley and at Merrist Wood and Hadlow Colleges his knowledge of this subject was extensive.

The talk embraced companion planting in its widest sense, from rotational planting of vegetables, through to beneficial plant associations and on to the clever grouping of plants for texture, colour and stature in the garden.

Matthew described the use of three and four year rotations to minimize the spread of pests and diseases. The use of low hedges could also be of benefit, not only in deterring pests, such as carrot root fly, but in making vegetable plots more interesting.

Using one plant species to either attract, or deter pests and diseases is a well known technique of the ancient herbalists and Matthew gave several examples of good companions. Dill with Cabbages deters aphids, basil under tomatoes for whitefly and aphids and African marigolds turned in before potatoes against eel worm. Borage deterred moles and Artemisia, mice. The silicon in Artemisia and horse tails deterred slugs and snails. However, steeped Rhubarb leaves sprayed against rose black spot needed to be treated with extreme caution, although steeped comfrey and nettle made excellent fertilisers.

Finally he discussed the placement of plants to provide contrasts in texture and colour, but warned against planting several different variegated leaved plants in the same area. Climbers planted in trees, or over buildings and ground cover plants to reduce water loss and weeds were all examples of companion planting.

  

LOOKING BACK: THE FOGGY BOTTOM STORY

Written by Peter Lyle. Posted in News

NORFOLK AND NORWICH HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY (NNHS) AND NEWLY APPOINTED PRESIDENT, ADRIAN BLOOM, ANNOUNCE NEW EVENTS AND REVITALISED MISSION:

  • NEW INITIATIVE in 2019 “Gardening for Everyone”.   NNHS reach out to a wider audience with a new, more inclusive mission.
  • NEW PRESIDENT, horticulturist Adrian Bloom, is working with General Secretary Lesley Webdale and the NNHS committee to take the new mission forward
  • TALK & MISSION INTRODUCTION, 27th April 2019, 6.30pm, John Innes Conference Centre, Norwich:A Special Event held by the Norfolk and Norwich Horticultural Society (NNHS) with a presentation by the new President of the Society, Adrian Bloom followed by a Forum to discuss the present and future of gardening and horticulture.
  • HOW TO BOOK: places at the talk cost £10 per person, including welcome drinks and an opportunity to engage with local gardening organisations before the talk. Booking form available at www.nnhs.org.uk/events or https://www.eventbrite.com/e/spring-talk-discussion-with-adrian-bloom-the-foggy-bottom-story-tickets-57923744479?aff=ebdshpsearchautocomplete

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

THE NNHS HERITAGE:

1829 - the year NNHS was formed, one of the earliest horticultural societies in Britain. Since then the society has organised yearly shows and garden visits and helped with the education of the general public in gardening.

2019 - NNHS still very active, a registered charity with HRH The Prince of Wales as patron, 46 affiliated societies in Norfolk and 260 members.  Concern about gradual decline of membership in societies all over the UK and few younger people becoming involved.

On his appointment as President Adrian said: “NNHS have a long history and proud place in horticulture. With primarily volunteer help the intention of the “Gardening for Everyone” mission is obvious, but it will take time to achieve. However with support and close cooperation with other horticulturists, keen gardeners and organisations we hope NNHS can act as a catalyst to encourage more people into gardening at all levels.”

THE BRESSINGHAM GARDENS HERITAGE:

1946 - Adrian Bloom’s father Alan established what became a famous nursery and gardens at Bressingham. Alan created the six acre Dell Garden devoted to hardy perennials, first opening to the public in 1962, the year Adrian and his brother Robert joined the family business.

1967 - Adrian began planting his own garden, which he and his wife Rosemary called Foggy Bottom.

2017 - Celebration of the 50 year old Foggy Bottom garden…and still growing.

2019 - The Bressingham Gardens now extends to 17 acres and is highly acclaimed by horticulturists and visitors, who are also able to enjoy the results of Alan Bloom's other passion… the Steam Museum. The gardens were featured on BBC Gardeners World in 2017 and 2019

THE TALK:

A LANDMARK EVENT. … not to be missed!  27 April 2019, 6.30pm at the John Innes Conference Centre, Norwich:

A Special Event held by the Norfolk and Norwich Horticultural Society (NNHS) with a presentation by Adrian Bloom, President of the Society, followed by a Forum with a panel of wide ranging experience to discuss the present and future of gardening and horticulture.

LOOKING BACK: THE FOGGY BOTTOM STORY

Adrian Bloom is presenting in a talk some of his own experiences in creating Foggy Bottom, his own 50 year old 6 acre garden, now renowned for year round colour, and featured in books and on many television programmes over the years. Since the garden began in 1967, Adrian has been ‘on trend’ with innovative plantings of conifers and heathers, ornamental grasses and perennials, plant combinations and rivers, as well as the always in vogue ...container grown plants.

The Smaller garden: since 1975, Adrian has always championed the average gardener with a smaller garden, and his talk will include some that he has designed in the UK, the USA and Canada - and “Given Away”. Many of these are shown in his books and on TV.

It’s all about the plants....

...and how you put them together. Adrian’s talk will also highlight some of the most reliable plants and will give recommendations, as well as plants for containers. 

LOOKING FORWARD: A FORUM ON THE FUTURE OF GARDENING AND HORTICULTURE 

A grandiose subject of course, the future is ongoing ...How can we inspire? 

The benefits of gardening could be briefly described as offering activity for mind and body, include edibles and ornamentals and plants in nature and the wild, as part of the living world of insects, birds and animals, the environment.  A potential for lifelong interest, creativity and therapy for all... 

So why are there fewer gardeners by far than there used to be?  Perhaps many reasons- space (or lack of), time, no childhood connection, too many distractions and competition for the consumer’s attention.  Changes in communication - TV, Smart Phones, Social Media etc. 

So what, if anything, can be done about it?  We can’t halt societal changes but gardeners and horticulturists can have a voice.  Building needs to be done from the top and the bottom, young and old (....and particularly middle aged.)   

Let the debate begin!

THE FORUM: 

Adrian Bloom will chair and we will hear from a group of enthusiastic and representative people, including:

  1. 2018 RHS School Gardening Champion, Matt Willer
  2. No Fear Gardening representative.
  3. NNHS chairman
  4. Local gardening club representative
  5. Local Horticulturalists Simon White (Peter Beales Roses) and Barry Gayton (Desert World Garden)
  6. HAVE YOUR SAY – Comments from the audience. 

Overall theme... Gardening for everyone ...a beginning ...creating a platform and structure for moving forward. 

Aim: eventual database of Horticultural Organisations and Garden Clubs, and resources for learning and sharing.  

EVENING PROGRAMME:

6.30pm – doors open for registration, welcome drinks and an opportunity to engage with local societies and organisations

7.30 pm Adrian Bloom talk “The Foggy Bottom Story”

8.30 pm break

8.45 pm—9.45pm Forum

BOOKING PROCESS:

Tickets £10 per person in advance. Booking form on NNHS website: www.nnhs.org.uk/events or book through Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/spring-talk-discussion-with-adrian-bloom-the-foggy-bottom-story-tickets-57923744479?aff=ebdshpsearchautocomplete

NNHS EVENTS IN 2019:

NNHS has a full programme of events for 2019, details of which are on their website and Facebook page. These include evening visits, coach trips and a garden holiday. The highlight of the year will be the President’s Evening at The Bressingham Gardens on Wednesday 17 July during which we will celebrate our achievements over the last 190 years and look forward to continuing our mission of “Gardening for All”.

Norfolk and Suffolk Group HPS AGM Agenda 2019

Written by Linda Hall. Posted in News

HARDY PLANT SOCIETY
NORFOLK & SUFFOLK GROUP
 
Annual General Meeting
Saturday 9th February 2019 at 2pm at Roydon Village Hall
 
AGENDA
 
1. Apologies for absence
 
2. To adopt the Minutes of the last AGM - 10th February 2018
 
3. Chairman’s Report
 
4. Secretary’s Report
 
5. Treasurer’s Report - Proposed subscription increase to £10 single and £15 joint commencing January 2020
 
6. To receive and adopt the Annual Accounts of the preceding financial year
 
7. Election of auditor/examiner
 
8. To deal with any special matters which the committee may wish to bring before the members and to receive suggestions from the members for consideration by the committee
 
9. Election of Officers and other committee members
 
10. Any other business

Indoor Meeting: Talk by Peter Skeggs-Gooch "Different Ways With Clematis"

Written by Cherry Williams. Posted in Events Past

Clematis "Liberty"

Clematis "Pixie"

Peter Skeggs Gooch

Peter Skeggs-Gooch

A talk by Peter Skeggs-Gooch. HPS 12 January 2019

Clematis are such a diverse genus – a collection of climbers, scramblers, herbaceous and evergreen plants flowering all through the seasons that they lend themselves to be used in ways other than the climbers we know.

Companion Planting with another shrub or climber gives them the natural support they need and extends the season of interest. Roses, Conifers, Wisteria, Honeysuckle and Trachelospermum are good examples. Choose colour combinations carefully.

Manmade Supports can screens areas, add height to the border, disguise buildings and fences. Obelisks, walls, porches, tennis courts you can train Clematis up anything.

Cut Flowers, Table Arrangements and Bridal Bouquets. To use the flowers seal the stems with an open flame and put in cold water, they will last for 14 days or so, the large flowered varieties don't last so not advisable to use.

Clematis in Pots. Not all varieties are suitable, some are bred specifically for this culture. Soil in a 2ft diameter pot should be 50/50 John Innes and Multi Purpose, the smaller the pot use more JI to MultiP. Remember to feed. Peter's favourites: Crystal Fountain, Pixie, Liberty and Taiga.

Ground Cover and Herbaceous. These Clematis are non clinging. They make good ground cover or let them scramble naturally over plants and shrubs. Peter's favourites: Arabella, Durandii, Cassandra, Integrifolia vars, Aromatica.

Late Season Flowerers. These Clematis extend the season up to October. Peter's favourites : Gravetye Beauty, Duchess of Albany, Princess Kate, Margot Koster, Venosa Violacea , Redheriana.

Visit www.thorncroftclematis.co.uk for their full catalogue

Indoor Meeting: Talk by Dr. Twigs Way "Virgins, Weeders and Queens - a History of Women Gardeners"

Written by Jenny Hodgson. Posted in Events Past

Virgins, Weeders and Queens - a History of Women Gardeners

A talk by Dr. Twigs Way. HPS 8 December 2018

This talk was based on the fascinating book by Dr. Way encompassing the role of women in gardening from Medieval Times to the present day. The Virgins, Weeders and Queens was added to the original title to make the book more saleable!

In the 1600's lower class women were allowed to grow food and medicinal herbs for money - 3p a day while men were paid 6p plus free herring and ale! If a husband who ran a Market Garden died, his wife could run it until a son could manage it. Mistress Tuggie who wrote The Book of Hours for women was just such a lady.

Queen Eleanor introduced hollyhocks and quinces and Queen Mary installed glasshouses at Hampton Court. She had a collection of exotic plants brought back by Captains from around the world. Princess Augusta continued her dead husband's work at Kew, building the Pagoda and Orangery and a collection of plants from around the world.

In the 1800s Aristocratic Ladies could nurture and water their gardens and conservatories. In the 1900s, Surplus Women whose husbands had died became Lady Gardeners. They were often  daughters of professional parents and  became Head Gardeners of Ladies' Estates.

After the war, ladies became more active. Gertrude Jekyll was the first female garden designer. Many were multi talented as was Vita Sackville West at Sissinghurst. The Land Army changed the role of women gardeners and the clothes they could wear improved their life dramatically.

Dr. Way finished her talk with the inspiring story of Beth Chatto whose wonderful garden many of us will have visited.